Zimbabwe dating culture

Rated 3.86/5 based on 977 customer reviews

In these distinct cultures, which generally are referred to as African and European, the most obvious differences are economic. Because of the impact of its colonial history on the nation's political, economic, and sociocultural life, it generally is identified more with southern Africa than with central Africa.

While the white minority lost political power after Independence, it has retained a disproportionate share of economic resources. A land-locked country of 242,700 square miles 390,580 square kilometers between the Zambezi River to the north and the Limpopo River to the south, it is bordered by Mozambique, South Africa, Botswana, Namibia, and Zambia.

The second city, Bulawayo, is in Matabeleland in the west, where most Ndebele-speaking people live. At the beginning of the twentieth century, the population is estimated to have been about six hundred thousand.

The 1992 national census estimated it at over ten million, and with a growth rate of 3 percent, it is expected to be over twelve million in 2000.

In the twentieth century, there were three major changes in the demographic and settlement pattern.

First, the acquisition of large tracts of land by white settlers for commercial agriculture, until shortly after World War II resulted in a situation in which half the land was owned by well under 1 percent of the population, with limited access to land for the vast majority of the rural population.

Cultural and religious traditions among the Shona, Ndebele and smaller groups of Tonga, Shangaan and Venda have similarities in regard to marriage practices and the belief in supernatural ancestors.

All those groups called on the support of the spirit world in the struggle for independence, which was achieved in 1980.

The capital, Harare, is located in Mashonaland, which covers the eastern two-thirds of the country and is the area where most Shona-speaking people live.The Ndebele in the nineteenth century were the first to use the name "Shona" to refer to the peoples they conquered; although the exact meaning of the term is unclear, it was probably derogatory.Later, white colonists extended the term to refer to all groups that spoke dialects officially recognized as Shona.Little is known about those early Bantu groups, but the present-day Shona can be traced to a group that moved into the area around 1200 From the eleventh century, after commercial relations were established with Swahili traders on the Mozambique coast, until the fifteenth century, the Shona kingdom was one of southern Africa's wealthiest and most powerful societies.Its political and religious center was probably Great Zimbabwe, a city of ten thousand to twenty thousand people built between the twelfth and fourteenth centuries by the Rozvi dynasty.

Leave a Reply