Interracial dating marriage articles

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In June, many Americans marked Loving Day—an annual gathering to fight racial prejudice through a celebration of multiracial community.The event takes its name from the 1967 Supreme Court ruling in Loving v. The case established marriage as a fundamental right for interracial couples, but 72 percent of the public opposed the court’s decision at the time.Accordingly, individuals across the political spectrum, from gay rights activists to opponents of Affirmative Action who call for colorblindness, cite it to support their political agendas.Yet, for 300 years, interracial marriage bans defined racial boundaries and served as justification for America’s apartheid system. Founding Myth, Foundational Rejection The first recorded interracial marriage in American history was the celebrated marriage of the daughter of a Powhatan chief and an English tobacco planter in 1614.Fifty years later, it seems absurd to most of us that such laws ever existed in the first place.But, as historian Jessica Viñas-Nelson explains, the fear of interracial marriage has been at the center of America's racial anxiety for a very long time.White men had sexual access to all women and exclusive access to white women.Interracial sex, so long as it remained out-of-wedlock and occurred between white men and black women, merited little legal or social consequence.

Virginia’s Racial Integrity Act of 1924 codified individuals as white only if they had “no trace whatsoever of any blood other than Caucasian,” except for those who had one-sixteenth or less blood from American Indians—the so-called “Pocahontas exception”—a concession to some elite families who claimed lineage from Rolfe and Pocahontas’s only child.Editor's Note: This year marks the 50th anniversary of the Supreme Court's Loving v.Virginia case that struck down laws prohibiting interracial marriage.A 1924 Health Bulletin issued by the state of Virginia to warn white residents of the estimated tens of thousands of “near white people” who should be avoided as “their children are likely to revert to the distinctly negro type even when all apparent evidence of mixture has disappeared.” The state seal featuring an American Indian heads the bulletin, even though someone with more than one-sixteenth American Indian ancestry would not be permitted to marry a white person in that state.While Rolfe—and his alleged future descendants—won esteem for association with an “Indian princess,” relatively little racial mixing occurred between English settlers and Native Americans.

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